Filed Under: 
Counties

Population
Change fm 2010
Area (sq.mi.)
Land area(sq.mi.)
Altitude (ft.)
Rainfall (in.)
Jan. avg. min.
July avg. max.
Civilian labor
Unemployed
Wages
Per Capita Inc.
Prop. Value
Retail Sales

3,869
– 6.3
1,454.4
1,453.9
1,840–2,487
23.03
29.2
94.4
1,441
4.3
$26,658,184
$54,573
$1,384,314,482
$26,022,377

map of Sutton County
Click to enlarge. Map legend.
 

Physical Features: Southwestern county; level in west, rugged terrain in east, broken by tributaries of Devils, Llano rivers; black, red loam soils.

Economy: Natural gas, ranching, hunting.

History: Lipan Apaches drove out Tonkawas in 1600s. Comanches, military outpost and disease forced Apaches south. Anglo-Americans settled in 1870s. Mexican immigration increased after 1890. County created from Crockett in 1887; organized in 1890; named for Confederate Col. John S. Sutton.

Race/Ethnicity: (In percent) Anglo, 37.5; Black, 1.2; Hispanic, 61.2; Asian, 0.7; Other, 1.2; Two or more races, 0.9.

Vital Statistics, annual: Births, 53; deaths, 30; marriages, 32; divorces, 12.

Recreation: Hunting, Meirs Museum, ranch museum, Caverns of Sonora, wildlife sanctuary, Cinco de Mayo.

Minerals: Oil, natural gas.

Agriculture: Meat goats (first in numbers), sheep, cattle, Angora goats (second in numbers). Exotic wildlife. Wheat and oats raised for grazing, hay; minor irrigation. Market value $10.9 million. Hunting leases important.

SONORA (3,358) county seat; natural gas production, ranching, tourism; Dry Devils River Music Flood in October.

Sutton County Courthouse

The Sutton County Courthouse in Sonora. Photo by Robert Plocheck.