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Counties

Population
Change fm 2010
Area (sq.mi.)
Land area(sq.mi.)
Altitude (ft.)
Rainfall (in.)
Jan. avg. min.
July avg. max.
Civilian labor
Unemployed
Wages
Per Capita Inc.
Prop. Value
Retail Sales

4,423
– 4.0
1,251.2
1,251.0
1,476–2,460
26.98
27.8
94.3
1,821
3.7
$10,529,066
$41,792
$2,264,578,819
$86,718,413

map of Kimble County
Click to enlarge. Map legend.
 

Physical Features: Picturesque Edwards Plateau; rugged, broken by numerous streams; drains to Llano River; sandy, gray, chocolate loam soils.

Economy: Livestock production and market, tourism, cedar oil and wood products, metal building materials.

locator map for Kimble County

History: Apache, Kiowa and Comanche area until the 1870s. U.S. military outposts protected the first Anglo-American settlers in the 1850s. County created from Bexar County in 1858 and organized in 1876. Named for George C. Kimble, a Gonzales volunteer who died at the Alamo.

Race/Ethnicity: (In percent) Anglo, 74.1; Black, 0.6; Hispanic, 23.7; Asian, 0.6; Other, 1.4; Two or more races, 0.6.

Vital Statistics, annual: Births, 46; deaths, 45; marriages, 34; divorces, 21.

Recreation: Hunting, fishing in spring-fed streams, nature tourism; among leading deer counties; state park; Kimble Kounty Kow Kick on Labor Day, Wild Game dinner on Thanksgiving Saturday.

Minerals: gravel.

Agriculture: Cattle, meat goats, sheep, Angora goats, pecans. Hunting leases important. Firewood, cedar sold.

JUNCTION (2,541) county seat; tourism, varied manufacturing, livestock production; two museums; Texas Tech University center; hospital; library, airport.

Other towns include: London (180); Roosevelt (14).

the old store at Telegraph

The old store at Telegraph. Photo by Robert Plocheck.