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Counties

Population
Change fm 2010
Area (sq.mi.)
Land area(sq.mi.)
Altitude (ft.)
Rainfall (in.)
Jan. avg. min.
July avg. max.
Civilian labor
Unemployed
Wages
Per Capita Inc.
Prop. Value
Retail Sales

8,744
– 3.3
920.1
910.7
836–1,510
32.92
29.7
94.4
3,869
3.4
$39,984,405
$42,319
$2,518,425,850
$39,637,452

map of Jack County
Click to enlarge. Map legend.

Physical Features: Rolling Cross Timbers, broken by West Fork of the Trinity, other streams; sandy, dark brown, loam soils; Lake Bridgeport, Lake Jacksboro, Lost Creek Reservoir.

Economy: Petroleum production, oil-field services, livestock, manufacturing, tourism.

locator map for Jack County

History: A Caddo and Comanche borderland. The first Anglo-American settlers arrived in 1855 as part of the Peters Colony. County named for brothers P.C. and W.H. Jack, who were leaders in Texas’ independence effort; created in 1856 from Cooke County; organized in 1857 with Mesquiteville (original name of Jacksboro) as the county seat.

Race/Ethnicity: (In percent) Anglo, 77.6; Black, 4.2; Hispanic, 16.3; Asian, 0.6; Other, 1.1; Two or more races, 1.1.

Vital Statistics, annual: Births, 99; deaths, 96; marriages, 74; divorces, 33.

Recreation: Hunting, wildlife leases; fishing; lake activities; Fort Richardson, Texas 4-H Museum (county is birthplace of 4-H clubs in Texas), other historic sites; Lost Creek Reservoir State Trailway.

Minerals: Oil, gas.

Agriculture: Cattle, hay, wheat, goats, sheep. Market value $22.5 million. Firewood sold.

JACKSBORO (4,702) county seat; agribusiness, petroleum production and services, tourism; hospital; library; Fort Richardson Living History Days in April.

Other towns include: Bryson (558), Jermyn (75), Perrin (438).

Fort Richardson

Fort Richardson, established in 1868. Photo by Robert Plocheck.