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Counties

Population
Change fm 2010
Area (sq.mi.)
Land area(sq.mi.)
Altitude (ft.)
Rainfall (in.)
Jan. avg. min.
July avg. max.
Civilian labor
Unemployed
Wages
Per Capita Inc.
Prop. Value
Retail Sales

14,222
4.1
472.4
466.1
131–420
45.12
36.9
94.4
4,571
4.5
$44,168,483
$30,114
$1,903,153,401
$243,339,643

map of Madison County
Click to enlarge. Map legend.
 

Physical Features: Hilly, draining to Trinity, Navasota rivers, Bedias Creek; one-fifth of area timbered; alluvial, loam, sandy soils.

Economy: Prison, government/services, varied manufacturing, agribusiness, oil production.

History: Caddo, Bidai Indian area; Kickapoos migrated from the east. Spanish settlements established in 1774 and 1805. Anglo-Americans arrived in 1829. Census of 1860 showed 30 percent of population was black. County named for U.S. President James Madison; created from Grimes, Leon, Walker counties 1853; organized 1854.

Race/Ethnicity: (In percent) Anglo, 55.3; Black, 20.4; Hispanic, 22.8; Asian, 0.8; Other, 1.3; Two or more races, 1.7.

Vital Statistics, annual: Births, 166; deaths, 126; marriages, 133; divorces, 50.

Recreation: Fishing, hunting; Spanish Bluff where survivors of the Gutíerrez-Magee expedition were executed in 1813; other historic sites.

Minerals: sand, oil.

Agriculture: Nursery crops, cattle, horses, poultry raised; forage for livestock. Market value $82.9 million.

MADISONVILLE (4,720) county seat; farm-trade center, varied manufacturing; hospital, library; Spring Fling in April.

Other towns, Midway (237); Normangee (717, mostly in Leon County); North Zulch (600).

fall colors in Madison County

Fall colors in Madison County. Photo by Ron Billings/Texas A&M Forest Service.