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Counties

Population
Change fm 2010
Area (sq.mi.)
Land area (sq.mi.)
Altitude (ft.)
Rainfall (in.)
Jan. avg. min.
July avg. max.
Civilian labor
Unemployed
Wages
Per Capita Inc.
Prop. Value
Retail Sales

5,202
– 1.8
1,136.2
1,136.1
230–878
23.79
44.8
96.7
1,851
6.2
$16,586,619
$27,317
$688,739,700
$31,594,691

map of Jim Hogg County
Click to enlarge. Map legend.
 

Physical Features: South Texas county on rolling plain, with heavy brush cover; white blow sand and sandy loam; hilly, broken.

Economy: Oil, cattle operations.

locator map for Jim Hogg County

History: Coahuiltecan area, then Lipan Apache. Spanish land grant in 1805 to Xavier Vela. County named for Gov. James Stephen Hogg; created and organized in 1913 from Brooks and Duval counties.

Race/Ethnicity: (In percent) Anglo, 5.6; Black, 0.8; Hispanic, 92.8; Asian, 0.5; Other, 0.5; Two or more races, 0.7. 

Vital Statistics, annual: Births, 90; deaths, 50; marriages, 30; divorces, 2.

Recreation: White-tailed deer and bobwhite hunting.

Minerals: Oil and gas.

Agriculture: Cattle, hay, milk goats; some irrigation. Market value $11.1 million.

HEBBRONVILLE (4,485) county seat; ranching, oil-field center.

Other towns include: Guerra (5), Las Lomitas (216), South Fork Estates (77), and Thompsonville (48).

Scotus College in Hebbronville, which closed in 1952

Scotus College in Hebbronville, still standing, was closed in 1952. Photo by Robert Plocheck.