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Early Texas Almanac Articles, 1857–1911

Filed Under: 
History

 

1857: POPULATION OF TEXAS

If we assume, what is probably near the truth, that there are eight inhabitants in the State for every legal voter, our present population cannot be much short of 500,000. . . .

 

1858: GENERAL DESCRIPTION

Along the river bottoms, and in low, wet places, chills and fevers prevail occasionally. A little prudence in placing the residence high, dry and exposed to the wind, as well as care in the use of water, prevents the prevalence of sickness to any great degree . . . .

 

1858: DALLAS COUNTY

There is a French town near Dallas. Dallas is some fifteen years old, with a population of about 400, and bids fair to become a considerable inland town. . . .

 

1858: GILLESPIE COUNTY

During the past eighteen months the Indians have given no trouble, though their depredations had been frequent for the three years previous. . . .

 

1858: TEXIAN

It is an indubitable fact that the inhabitants of Texas, literate and illiterate, have almost universally adopted the term Texian, to define their political individuality, and we are not apprised of any rule of language that is violated in doing so. . . .

 

1859: INDIAN RESERVES

These Brazos Reserve Indians have made extraordinary progress in civilization, since their settlement in 1853; and are very honest, trustworthy and industrious. . . .

 

1862: PREFACE

At the time it was written, it was our intention to publish the State Constitution, to which allusion is made on page 16, as forming a part of this work; but the causes above referred to, have compelled us to curtail our present issue of much valuable matter we had on hand, which must now lay over till next year, when we confidently expect to announce the commencement of a year of peace, and an era of prosperity hitherto unexampled in our history. . . .

 

1863: JOINT RESOLUTIONS

Resolved, 1st. That the people of Texas do hereby assure her sister Confederate States, and the world, that she stands ready, with heart and hand, to resist our invaders until their last soldier is driven from our borders, and until we shall conquer an honorable and glorious peace. . . .

 

1867: HARRIS COUNTY

There are two cotton and wool factories now being constructed in Houston or its immediate vicinity, and both will be in operation in a few months. There is every reason to believe that Houston will eventually become a large manufacturing town, as its railroads, timber, and water give it great advantages. . . .

 

1870: LEGISLATURE

Democrats and Conservatives 40; Radicals, 50. . . .

 

1872: SURVIVORS OF THE TEXAS REVOLUTION

The following brief sketches of some of the present survivors of the Texas revolution have been received from time to time during the past year. We shall be glad to have the list extended from year to year, so that, by reference to our Almanac, our readers may know who among those sketches, it will be seen, give many interesting incidents of the war of the revolution. We give the sketches, as far as possible, in the language of the writers themselves. . . .

 

1873: THE NORTHERS OF TEXAS

For several hours preceding the most violent of these dry northers there is almost a dead calm and the air is unusually warm and sultry. A few low, sluggish bodies of cloud float about in the eddy atmosphere. A dark, muddy looking cloud wave next appears low down all across the northern horizon, which is the “precautionary signal” of the near approach of this strange Texas storm. . . .

 

1873: TEXAS SCHOOLS

The illiteracy in our State is appalling—70,895 white and 150,617 colored persons over ten years old who can neither read nor write ! But it is an encouraging feature that 3687 teachers have already been examined and commissioned to teach, while there are probably as many more, say in all 7000 public teachers, in Texas, to a scholastic population of 227,615. . . .

 

1904: PRESIDIO COUNTY

Marfa, the county seat, is on the railroad, situated 423 miles west of San Antonio and 197 miles east of El Paso, has a population of about 900, and is noted as a health resort for persons afflicted with consumption and asthma. The elevation of Marfa is 4696 feet, and malarial or other fevers are not known here. Marfa is a well built, neat and prosperous town, and is a distributing point for an immense territory, as all freight for Fort Davis on the north, Shafter and Presidio on the south, and the Terlingua mining district on the southeast, is hauled by wagon trains from Marfa. . . .

 

1904: UNORGANIZED COUNTIES

The great Capitol Syndicate ranch, comprising the 3,000,000 acres of land which the State gave for the erection of its capitol building, comprises the whole of Parmer, one-eighth of Bailey and one-half of Lamb County. In all the other unorganized counties the State owns much school land, which is under lease, but during the past few years some of the large pastures have been broken up and the land sold to settlers. . . .

 

1911: AUTOMOBILES IN TEXAS

Ten years ago an automobile was a curiosity in the leading cities of Texas. Five years ago the people in many counties had never seen what was then known as the horseless carriage. Today it is estimated that the number of automobiles in actual service in Texas will reach nearly 30,000 and that over $40,000,000 is invested in the machines. . . .

 

Texas Almanac

Texas Almanac