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Counties

Population
Change fm 2010
Area (sq.mi.)
Land area(sq.mi.)
Altitude (ft.)
Rainfall (in.)
Jan. avg. min.
July avg. max.
Civilian labor
Unemployed
Wages
Per Capita Inc.
Prop. Value
Retail Sales

8,775
3.3
192.0
186.5
550–1,310
36.87
27.4
97.0
4,288
4.2
$54,352,058
$43,880
$3,215,692,986
$49,086,295

map of Somervell County
Click to enlarge. Map legend.
 

Physical Features: Hilly terrain southwest of Fort Worth; Brazos, Paluxy rivers; Squaw Creek Reservoir; gray, dark, alluvial soils; second-smallest county.

Economy: Tourism, nuclear power plant, government/services, commuters, natural gas.

History: Wichita, Tonkawa area; Comanches later. Anglo-Americans arrived in the 1850s. County created in 1875 as Somerville County from Hood County, organized the same year. Spelling was changed in 1876; named for Republic of Texas Gen. Alexander Somervell.

Race/Ethnicity: (In percent) Anglo, 76.8; Black, 1.2; Hispanic, 19.2; Asian, 1.1; Other, 1.5; Two or more races, 2.3.

Vital Statistics, annual: Births, 85; deaths, 98; marriages, 74; divorces, 36.

Recreation: Fishing, hunting; unique geological formations; dinosaur tracks in state park; Glen Rose Big Rocks Park; Fossil Rim Wildlife Center; nature trails, museums; exposition center; Paluxy Pedal bicycle ride in October.

Minerals: Sand, gravel, silica, natural gas.

Agriculture: Cattle, hay, horses, nurseries. Market value $4.3 million. Hunting leases important.

GLEN ROSE (2,653) county seat; nuclear power plant, tourism, farm trade center; hospital; Hill College branch.

Other towns include: Nemo (56); Rainbow (121).

Somervell pronunciation

 

Dinosaur Valley State Park

Theropod tracks in rock at Dinosaur Valley State Park. Photo by Gary S. Hickinbotham.