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Counties

Population
Change fm 2010
Area (sq.mi.)
Land area(sq.mi.)
Altitude (ft.)
Rainfall (in.)
Jan. avg. min.
July avg. max.
Civilian labor
Unemployed
Wages
Per Capita Inc.
Prop. Value
Retail Sales

17,050
0.8
907.5
905.4
1,800–2,840
22.68
28.2
93.9
6,672
4.0
$89,141,163
$45,218
$3,246,724,583
$192,955,433

map of Scurry County
Click to enlarge. Map legend.
 

Physical Features: Plains county below Caprock, some hills; drained by Colorado, Brazos tributaries; Lake J.B. Thomas; sandy, loam soils.

Economy: Oil, government/services, agribusiness, manufacturing.

History: Apaches; displaced later by Comanches who were relocated to Indian Territory in 1875. Ranching began in the late 1870s. County created from Bexar District in 1876; organized in 1884; named for Confederate Gen. W.R. Scurry.

Race/Ethnicity: (In percent) Anglo, 53.4; Black, 5.1; Hispanic, 40.1; Asian, 0.9; Other, 1.4; Two or more races, 1.6.

Vital Statistics, annual: Births, 261; deaths, 179; marriages, 132; divorces, 58.

Recreation: Lake J.B. Thomas water recreation; Towle Memorial Park; museums, community theater, White Buffalo Days and Bikefest in October.

Minerals: Oil, gas.

Agriculture: Cotton, wheat, cattle, hay. Market value $29 million.

SNYDER (11,707) county seat; oil, wind energy, agriculture; Western Texas College, hospital, museum; Western Swing days in June.

Other towns include: Dunn (75); Fluvanna (180); Hermleigh (339); Ira (250).

Scurry pronunciation

 

A farmhouse near Camp Springs

A farmhouse near Camp Springs. Photo by Robert Plocheck.