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Texas Droughts

Filed Under: 
Environment

 

Climatic Regions of Texas

 

The following table shows the extent of drought by major region (abbreviated) by listing the percent of normal precipitation. Drought here is arbitrarily defined as when there is less than 75 percent of normal precipitation. There was no drought in any region in the years not listed. Note that in 2011, as well as 1917 and 1956, all the regions were in drought. Source: Office of State Climatologist, Texas A&M University.

Year HP LRP NC ET TP EP SC UC ST LV
2014
   73              
2013 74







 
2012 68 74





74 82
2011 40 43 65 63 29 49 47 47 46 52
2010       70            
2008           66 61      
2006           66        
2005     68 66            72
2003 65 71                
2001         56          
2000         74          67
1999     73     67 69 69    
1998   69      71          
1996             71   60 70
1994          68          
1990                    73
1989            72      66  64
1988            67  62  67  68  
1970  65  63        72        
1964  74        69          63
1963      63  68    65  61  73    
1962            68      67  65
1956  51  57  61  68  44  43  55  62  53  53
1954  70  71  68  73    50  50  57  71  
1953  69        49  73        
1952  68  66
   73


 56  70
1951


   61  53


 
1950


         68    74  64
1948      73
 74  62    71   67    
1943

 72






1939





 69

 72
1937







 72
1934  66


 46  69



1933  72


 62  68



1927






 74
 74
1925

 72


 72


1924

 73  73
 71
 72

1922



 68




1921



 72



 73
1920








 71
1917  58  50  63  59  44  46  42  50  32  48
1916
 73
 74  70
 73  69

1911








 70
1910  59  59  64  69  43  65  69  74  59
1909

 72  68  67  74  70


1907








 65
1902







 65  73
1901
 71  70

 60  62  70  44
1898







 69  51
1897




   73    72
1894



 68




1893

 67  70
 49  56  64  53  59
1892



 68

 73

Year HP LRP NC ET TP EP SC UP ST LV

Drought has proven to be difficult to define and there is no universally accepted definition. The most commonly used drought definitions are based on meteorological, agricultural, hydrological and socioeconomic effects. (These definitions are from the New Mexico Drought Planning Team website.)

Meteorological drought is often defined by a period of substantially diminished precipitation duration and/or intensity. The commonly used definition of meteorological drought is an interval of time, generally on the order of months or years, during which the actual moisture supply at a given place consistently falls below the climatically appropriate moisture supply.

Agricultural drought occurs when there is inadequate soil moisture to meet the needs of a particular crop at a particular time. Agricultural drought usually occurs after or during meteorological drought but before hydrological drought and can also affect livestock and other dry-land agricultural operations.

Hydrological drought refers to deficiencies in surface and subsurface water supplies. It is measured as streamflow and as lake, reservoir and groundwater levels. There is usually a delay between lack of rain and less measurable water in streams, lakes and reservoirs. Therefore, hydrological measurements tend to lag other drought indicators.

Socioeconomic drought occurs when physical water shortages start to affect the health, well-being, and quality of life of the people, or when the drought starts to affect the supply and demand of an economic product. 
 


Texas Almanac

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